Skip to main content

Research Repository

Advanced Search

Tensions in intergenerational practice guidance: intergroup contact versus community development

Wright Bevans, Katie; Murray, Michael; Lamont, Alexandra

Tensions in intergenerational practice guidance: intergroup contact versus community development Thumbnail


Authors

Michael Murray



Abstract

Intergenerational practice (IP) is an approach within community health promotion which aims to bring older and younger community members together in collaborative activity. Little research has critically examined the assumptions and values within IP and their implications for these communities. A sample of 15 IP planning documents were analysed using a social constructionist thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke2006) guided by Prior’s (2008) concept of documents as active agents. Three tensions were identified: a community-led model versus a contact model; old and young as targets versus older people as targets; and process-focused versus out­come-focused evaluation. IP has relied on contact theory as a mechanism of change, which has rooted IP to an overly individualistic practice tar­geted at older people (rather than all ages). In contrast, the community-led ethos of IP was also evident alongside values of mutual benefit for old and young, and a desire for more process-focused evaluation.

Citation

Wright Bevans, K., Murray, M., & Lamont, A. (2020). Tensions in intergenerational practice guidance: intergroup contact versus community development. International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, 14(2), https://doi.org/10.3384/ijal.1652-8670.3228

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Aug 19, 2020
Publication Date Aug 24, 2020
Journal International Journal of Ageing and Later Life
Publisher Linköping University Electronic Press
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
Volume 14
Issue 2
DOI https://doi.org/10.3384/ijal.1652-8670.3228
Keywords community, guidance, health, intergenerational, document analysis, ageing, social representations
Publisher URL https://ijal.se/article/view/3228

Files




You might also like



Downloadable Citations