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Relationship between deprivation, and the uptake and use of the common ailments service in community pharmacies in Wales.

Thayer, Nick; Mackridge, Adam John; White, Simon

Authors

Nick Thayer

Adam John Mackridge



Abstract

Since 2013 community pharmacies in Wales have been commissioned to provide a common ailments service (CAS), providing pharmacy medicine without charge to patients. In the first review of national pharmacy data, this study aimed to describe the relationship between provision of CAS and deprivation. A retrospective observational study, using CAS claims data from April 2022 to March 2023 collected as part of routine service delivery. Consultation data were matched to the index of multiple deprivation (IMD) decile of the providing pharmacy. Linear regression was used to describe the correlation between CAS claims data and IMD deciles of the pharmacy postcode. In the study period, 239 028 consultations were recorded. More than twice as many consultations were carried out in pharmacies located in the most deprived decile (33 950) than in pharmacies in the least deprived decile (14 465). Linear regression demonstrated a significant correlation r(10) = -0.927, P < 0.001. There was a strong relationship between greater numbers of consultations and greater deprivation of the pharmacy postcode (R2 = 0.887). This significant correlation with deprivation was also found in the majority of individual conditions. There was no significant correlation between deprivation decile and the number of consultations per patient. Community pharmacies offer a key resource for tackling health inequalities. Patients in those areas with the greatest need are those most likely to use the CAS in pharmacies and receive the care they need. Commissioning services like this naturally supports deprived communities, through a combination of patient behaviours, location, and accessibility. [Abstract copyright: © The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.]

Journal Article Type Article
Acceptance Date Sep 19, 2023
Online Publication Date Oct 6, 2023
Deposit Date Oct 23, 2023
Journal The International journal of pharmacy practice
Print ISSN 0961-7671
Electronic ISSN 2042-7174
Publisher Wiley
Peer Reviewed Peer Reviewed
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/ijpp/riad067
Keywords pharmaceutical public health, community pharmacy, research method, new contract, pharmaceutical needs assessment, health economics