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Social Media: The Changing Nature of Politics and Politicians – from MPs to ‘Celebrities’

Higson-Bliss

Authors



Abstract

The dramatic advancement of social media since 2008 has changed how the public interact and hold political figures to account, where in some instances, politicians are seen more as celebrities - #dishyrishi. Though the likes of Twitter and Facebook existed in 2008, its use by politicians was limited. When an event happened, no matter how mundane or world-shattering it was, information about this occurrence would be distributed either by word-of-mouth or traditional forms of communication (i.e. radio or traditional media). Today, with the help of social media, news stories can be shared with the world in a matter of seconds. Consequently, where we may have traditionally ignored the ‘moral discrepancies’ of our politicians, social media forces stories into the public domain where we have become more interested in the honesty of our political actors rather than policy agendas. Indeed, anecdotally policies and laws are often pushed through parliament whilst public attention is drawn elsewhere.

Citation

Higson-Bliss. Social Media: The Changing Nature of Politics and Politicians – from MPs to ‘Celebrities’. Presented at The continuing crisis: Exploring the moral significance of the developments in politics, economic policy and the law since the 2008 banking crisis

Conference Name The continuing crisis: Exploring the moral significance of the developments in politics, economic policy and the law since the 2008 banking crisis
Acceptance Date Dec 1, 2022
Publication Date Dec 1, 2022
Series Title The continuing crisis: Exploring the moral significance of the developments in politics, economic policy and the law since the 2008 banking crisis