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Acceptability of predictive testing for ischemic heart disease in those with a family history and the impact of results on behavioural intention and behaviour change: a systematic review.

Mallen

Acceptability of predictive testing for ischemic heart disease in those with a family history and the impact of results on behavioural intention and behaviour change: a systematic review. Thumbnail


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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Tests to predict the development of chronic diseases in those with a family history of the disease are becoming increasingly available and can identify those who may benefit most from preventive interventions. It is important to understand the acceptability of these predictive approaches to inform the development of tools to support decision making. Whilst data are lacking for many diseases, data are available for ischemic heart disease (IHD). Therefore, this study investigates the willingness of those with a family history of IHD to take a predictive test, and the effect of the test results on risk-related behaviours. METHOD: Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, LILACS and grey literature were searched. Primary research, including adult participants with a family history of IHD, and assessing a predictive test were included. Qualitative and quantitative outcomes measuring willingness to take a predictive test and the effect of test results on risk-related behaviours were also included. Data concerning study aims, participants, design, predictive test, intervention and findings were extracted. Study quality was assessed using the Standard Quality Assessment Criteria for Evaluating Research Papers from a Variety of Fields and a narrative synthesis undertaken. RESULTS: Five quantitative and two qualitative studies were included. These were conducted in the Netherlands (n?=?1), Australia (n?= 1), USA (n?= 1) and the UK (n?= 4). Methodological quality ranged from moderate to good. Three studies found that most relatives were willing to take a predictive test, reporting family history (n?= 2) and general practitioner (GP) recommendation (n?= 1) as determinants of interest. Studies assessing the effect of test results on behavioural intentions (n?= 2) found increased intentions to engage in physical activity and smoking cessation, but not healthy eating in those at increased risk of developing IHD. In studies examining actual behaviour change (n?= 2) most participants reported engaging in at least one preventive behaviour, particularly medication adherence. CONCLUSION: The results suggests that predictive approaches are acceptable to those with a family history of IHD and have a positive impact on health behaviours. Further studies are needed to provide a comprehensive understanding of predictive approaches in IHD and other chronic conditions.

Acceptance Date Feb 2, 2022
Publication Date Sep 15, 2022
Journal BMC Public Health
Publisher Springer Verlag
Pages 1751 - ?
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-14116-6
Publisher URL https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-022-14116-6

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