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The long-term impact of childhood wartime trauma on anxiety in later life: an exploration of the literature

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Abstract

At any point in time up to 10% of people over the age of 65 experience symptoms of anxiety. Yet the effects of anxiety in the older population are under-researched. Paternal separation in childhood has been cited as a factor for psychological well-being later in life, potentially with greater significance for males. A period of notable paternal separation was during the second world war, when 1.5 million British children were evacuated from cities. A number of authors have explored the effect of childhood trauma on mental health and found that such events are implicated in the development of anxiety and depression. This article will explore the research carried out and how this knowledge may support the work of clinicians in older age mental health services to understand the life experiences of the people they care for.

Citation

(2017). The long-term impact of childhood wartime trauma on anxiety in later life: an exploration of the literature. Mental Health Practice, https://doi.org/10.7748/mhp.2017.e1215

Acceptance Date Jun 28, 2017
Publication Date Dec 7, 2017
Journal Mental Heath Practice
Print ISSN 1465-8720
Publisher RCN Publishing (RCNi)
DOI https://doi.org/10.7748/mhp.2017.e1215
Keywords mental health; anxiety; later life; World War Two; childhood trauma
Publisher URL https://journals.rcni.com/mental-health-practice/the-longterm-effects-of-childhood-wartime-trauma-on-anxiety-in-later-life-mhp.2017.e1215

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