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‘Queer transplanting from the Himalayas to Yorkshire: Reginald Farrer’s loves for men and alpine plants (1880-1920)’ (2022)
Book Chapter

Ranging from the mid-19th century to the present, and from Edinburgh to Plymouth, this powerful collection explores the significance of locality in queer space and experiences in modern British history. The chapters cover a broad range of themes f... Read More about ‘Queer transplanting from the Himalayas to Yorkshire: Reginald Farrer’s loves for men and alpine plants (1880-1920)’.

Poor-law institutions through working-class eyes: autobiography, emotion, and family context 1834-1914 (2021)
Journal Article

Histories of the English workhouse and its satellite institutions have concentrated on legal change, institutional administration, and moments of shock or scandal, generally without considering the place of these institutions, established through the... Read More about Poor-law institutions through working-class eyes: autobiography, emotion, and family context 1834-1914.

He shall have care of the garden, its cultivation and produce’: Workhousegardens and gardening, c.1780-1835 (2021)
Journal Article

Where productive workhouse gardens and land existed they comprised an essential aspect of institutional management, yet they feature only briefly in accounts of workhouses and inmates' lives. Their location, desirability and benefits, however, occupi... Read More about He shall have care of the garden, its cultivation and produce’: Workhousegardens and gardening, c.1780-1835.

‘Scots and Scabs from North-by-Tweed’: Undesirable Scottish Migrants in Seventeenth- and Early Eighteenth-Century England (2019)
Journal Article

While very prominent in the contemporary world, anxiety about the potentially negative impact that immigrants might have on their host communities has deep historical roots. In a British context, such fears were particularly heightened following the... Read More about ‘Scots and Scabs from North-by-Tweed’: Undesirable Scottish Migrants in Seventeenth- and Early Eighteenth-Century England.